General A. W. Greely AP-141 - History

General A. W. Greely AP-141 - History


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General A. Greely AP-141

General A. Greely

Adolphus Washington Greely, born 27 March 1844 in Newburyport, Mass., enlisted as a private in the 19th Massachusetts Infantry 26 July 1801 and participated in numerous battles throughout the Civil War. Appointed Second Lieutenant in 1867, between 1871 and 1881 he served in Texas and in Montana and Dakota Territories, svhere he helped construct 2,000 miles of telegraph lines. A pioneer in polar exploration he studied Arctic weather and climate, and from 1881 to 1884 led an ill-fated expedition during the establishment of a chain of circumpolar research stations. In 1882 his party pushed farther northward than any previous expedition but. suffering great hardships, only seven men, including Greely, survived the ordeal. From 1887 until 1906 he served as Chief Signal Officer and administered the Weather Bureua and Signal Corps. During the Spanish-American War he supervised the construction of more than 25,000 miles of telegraph lines in Cuba, Puerto Rico, China, and the Philippine Islands. Also a pioneer in the use of wireless communications, he established several radio stations in Alaska. Promoted to Major General 10 February 1906, he commanded military relief operations following the San Francisco Earthquake 18 to 19 April. General Greely retired 27 March 1908 and died in Washington, D.C., 20 October 1935. By special legislation of Congress, he was awarded the Medal of Honor 21 March 1935 for his life of splendid public service.

(AP-141: dp. 9,950 (It.); 1. 522'10"; b. 71'6"; dr. 26'6"; s. 17 k., cpl. 356, trp. 3,823, a. 4 5" 4 40mm., 16 20mm.;

cl. (General G. o. Squier; T. C4 S-A1)

General A. Greely (AP-141) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract 18 July 1944 by Kaiser Co., Inc., Yard 3, Richmond, Calif.; launched 5 November 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Clarke Wayland; acquired by the Navy 22 March 1945; and commissioned the same day, Comdr. George W. Stedman, Jr., in command.

After shakedown, General A. Greely embarked 2,923 troops and civilians and departed San Pedro 1 6 April for Australia. She reached Melbourne 4 May then sailed the next day for Fremantle and India, arriving Calvutta 20 May. After embarking homebound troops, she departed the 28th, steamed via Ceylon and Suez, and arrived Newport News, Va., 22 June. From 28 June to 7 July shc sniled to Le Havre, France' where she embarked 3,000 troops before returning to New York 18 July. Between 28 July and 6 December she completed two roundtrip voyages from New York to Calvutta, transporting occupation troops, mail, and cargo, and returning homebound veterans to the United States. Departing New York 14 December, she reached Rarachi, India, 4 January 1946 and embarked additional returning veterans. She sailed 6 January for the West Coast, and, steaming via Ceylon, Singapore, and the Philippines, she arrived Seattle 2 February. She decommissioned at San Francisco 29 March and was transferred to WSA the same day for use as a transport in the Army Transportation Service.

Reacquired by the Navy 1 March 1950, General A. Greely was assigned to MSTS under a civilian crew. She departed Seattle 5 August and carried troops to the Far Fast in support of the effort to repel Communist aggression in Korea. Operating out of Seattle, during the next nine months she made four round-trip voyages to Japan, Korea, and Okinawa. Returning to Seattle 3 May 1951, she then sailed 24 May for duty in the Atlantic.

Operating out of New York, between 10 October and 22 February 1953 General A. Greely completed numerous transatlantic runs to Bremerhaven, Germany, and La Pallice, France. While en route to Bremerhaven in January 1952, she rescued survivors from the stricken merchantman, Flying Enterprise. Placed in reduced operational status from 17 April until 5 June 1953, she departed Norfolk 16 June for Thule, Greenland. Arriving 3 July, she served until 30 September as barracks ship during Operation "Blue Jay," the construction of Thule Air Force Base. She returned to New York 9 October; steamed to Bremerhaven and back between l0 November and 4 December, and was again placed in reduced operational status from 9 December until 19 July 1954.

General A. Greely departed New York 27 July. bound for the Pacific. Arriving San Francisco 11 August, she sailed for the Far East 7 September and operated in Korean and Japanese waters before returning to San Francisco via Adak, Alaska, 10 October. She steamed to Portland, Oreg., 27 October: entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego in March 1955, and was transferred to the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Olympia, Wash., 29 August 1959 where she remains.


General A. W. Greely AP-141 - History

USS General A.W. Greely , a 9950-ton C4 type transport, was built at Richmond, California, in 1944-45. Acquired by the Navy and commissioned in March 1945, she performed personnel transportation duties in the Pacific, the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic for the next year. She was decommissioned in March 1946 and transferred to the Army Transportation Service, in whose hands she continued to carry troops and other personnel until March 1950, when she was reacquired by the Navy and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) under the designation T-AP-141.

From the summer of 1950 to May 1951, USNS General A.W. Greely made four voyages from the U.S. to Japan in support of Korean War needs. She then shifted to the Atlantic, where she transported personnel to and from Europe and provided other services for three more years. General A.W. Greely briefly operated in the Pacific from mid-1954 until she was placed out of service in March 1955.

After being laid up for well over a decade, General A.W. Greely was sold for commercial use. Converted to a container ship in 1968, she subsequently was renamed several times, becoming Hawaii Bear in 1969, Austral Glade in 1975, Pacific Enterprise in 1979 and Caribe Enterprise in 1982. She was sold for scrapping in 1986.

This page features all the views we have concerning USS/USNS General A.W. Greely and the U.S. Army Transport General A.W. Greely .

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS General A.W. Greely (AP-141)

Halftone reproduction of a photograph of the ship in port, circa 1946. She appears to have been repainted in the colors of the U.S. Army Transporation service, with which she served as USAT General A.W. Greely from 1946 to 1950, after which she was USNS General A.W. Greely (T-AP-141).

Copied from the book "Troopships of World War II", by Roland W. Charles.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 65KB 740 x 525 pixels

USNS General A.W. Greely (T-AP-141)

Photographed circa the early 1950s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 106KB 740 x 610 pixels

USNS General A.W. Greely (T-AP-141)

Amid the ice at Thule, Greenland, during Operation "Blue Jay", 19 July 1951.
USS LSM-397 is alongside.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 109KB 740 x 610 pixels

SS Flying Enterprise (left distance)

Listing heavily to port in stormy seas in the northeastern Atlantic, seen from USNS General A.W. Greely (T-AP-141), circa 29 December 1951. At right is a lifeboat, returning to the General A.W. Greely with survivors of the Flying Enterprise . A merchant tanker is standing by off the listing ship's bow.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the "All Hands" collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 200KB 740 x 630 pixels

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Text modified 23 November 1999
New image added and coding updated 12 February 2007


Operational history

The Greely was a C4 type transport, laid down under Maritime Commission contract 18 July 1944 by Kaiser Co., Inc., Yard 3, Richmond, California launched 5 November 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Clarke Wayland acquired by the Navy 22 March 1945 and commissioned the same day, Commander George W. Stedman Jr. in command.

After shakedown, General A. W. Greely embarked 2,923 troops and civilians and departed San Pedro, California, 16 April for Australia. She reached Melbourne, 4 May, then sailed the next day for Fremantle and India, arriving Calcutta, 20 May. After embarking homebound troops, she departed 28 May steamed via Ceylon and Suez and arrived Newport News, Virginia, 22 June. From 28 June to 7 July she sailed to Le Havre, France, where she embarked 3,000 troops before returning to New York, NY, 18 July. Between 28 July and 6 December she completed two round-trip voyages from New York to Calcutta, transporting occupation troops, mail, and cargo and returning home-bound veterans to the United States. Departing New York 14 December, she reached Karachi, India, 4 January 1946 and embarked additional returning veterans. She sailed 6 January for the West Coast and, steaming via Ceylon, Singapore, and the Philippines, she arrived Seattle, Washington, 2 February. She decommissioned at San Francisco, California, 29 March and was transferred to WSA the same day for use as a transport in the Army Transportation Service, as USAT General A. W. Greely. On 18 February 1950, USAT General Greely left Bremerhaven, Germany, transporting Displaced Persons to the U.S.A. and arrived at Ellis Island March 3 1950. Reacquired by the Navy 1 March 1950, the ship was assigned to Military Sea Transportation Service under a civilian crew and her designation was changed to USNS General A. W. Greely (T-AP-141). She departed Seattle 5 August and carried troops to the Far East in support of the effort to repel Communist expansion in Korea. Operating out of Seattle, during the next nine months she made four round-trip voyages to Japan, Korea, and Okinawa. Returning to Seattle 3 May 1951, she then sailed 24 May for duty in the Atlantic.

Operating out of New York, between 10 October and 22 February 1953 General A. W. Greely completed numerous transatlantic runs to Bremerhaven, Germany, and La Pallice, France. The highlight of these runs occurred while en route to Bremerhaven in January 1952, she rescued survivors from the stricken merchantman SS Flying Enterprise.

Placed in reduced operational status from 17 April until 5 June 1953, she departed Norfolk 16 June for Thule, Greenland. Arriving 3 July, she served until 30 September as barracks ship during Operation "Blue Jay," the construction of Thule Air Force Base. She returned to New York 9 October steamed to Bremerhaven and back between 10 November and 4 December and was again placed in reduced operational status from 9 December until 19 July 1954.

General A. W. Greely departed New York 27 July, bound for the Pacific. Arriving San Francisco 11 August, she sailed for the Far East 7 September and operated in Korean and Japanese waters before returning to San Francisco via Adak, Alaska, 10 October. She steamed to Portland, Oregon, 27 October entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego in March 1955 and was transferred to the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Olympia, Washington, 29 August 1959.

After being laid up in the reserve fleets for well over a decade, General A.W. Greely was sold for commercial use.

Converted to a container ship in 1968, she subsequently was renamed several times, becoming SS Hawaii Bear in 1969, SS Austral Glade in 1975, SS Pacific Enterprise in 1979 and SS Caribe Enterprise in 1982. She was sold for scrapping in 1986.


He was awarded an Honorary Fellowship and the Daly Medal by the American Geographical Society in 1922. Ε]

On May 28, 1986, the United States Postal Service issued a 22 cent postage stamp in his honor. Ζ]

Medal of Honor citation [ edit | edit source ]

He received the Medal of Honor in 1935. Rank and organization: Major General, U.S. Army, retired. Place and date: ----. Entered service at: Louisiana. Born: March 27, 1844, Newburyport, Mass. G.O. No.: 3, W.D., 1935. Act of Congress, March 21, 1935.

For his life of splendid public service, begun on March 27, 1844, having enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army on July 26, 1861, and by successive promotions was commissioned as major general February 10, 1906, and retired by operation of law on his 64th birthday.

Greely's medal was awarded in contradiction to the revised 1916 Army warrant requiring combat action and risk of life "above and beyond the call of duty." Η] However, his Medal was the second Army presentation contrary to the combat requirement, as Charles Lindbergh (an Army reservist not on active duty) received the award for his solo transatlantic flight eight years before, in 1927. Until after WW II the Navy Medal of Honor could be awarded for noncombat actions, reflecting different criteria within the United States armed forces.

USS General A. W. Greely (AP-141) [ edit | edit source ]

The USS General A. W. Greely (AP-141), launched November 1944, was named in his honor.

Fort Greely [ edit | edit source ]

Big Delta Air Force Base, Alaska, was designated Fort Greely on August 6, 1955, in honor of Major General Adolphus Washington Greely. ⎖] ⎗]


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BCGMCNC Historical Research Team: The U.S. Navy, the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) and the Merchant Marine played a big factor in deploying personnel, equipment and supplies 5000 miles between the United States and the Korean War zone during 1950-53.

According to Villahermosa’s Honor and Fidelity book, page 24, once the 65th Inf. Reg. landed in Panama from Puerto Rico on the USS Marine Lynx (T-AP-194) ship, the 3rd Batt. and it’s regimental heavy mortar company transferred over to the USS Sergeant Howard E. Woodward ship to relieve congestion. On August 31, 1950, both ships sailed off to Japan for the Korean War.

The USS Sergeant Howard E. Woodward would break down in the middle of the pacific and needed to return to Hawaii where they would switch over to the GENERAL EDWIN D. PATRICK (AP-124/T-AP-124) ship.

“BCGMCNC Full Disclosure: BCGMCNC and the Historical Research Team's Volunteer(s) neither are or claim to be the owners of these photos. The BCGMCNC Honor Badge/HRT title insert(s), creative presentation of articles and photos are for the sole purpose of identifying the source investing time, researching, and establishing a context that can facilitate a better viewing for your enjoyment…Thank you for respectfully reading through.”


Honors and awards

Military decorations and medals:

Medal of Honor citation

General Greely received the Medal of Honor in 1935. Rank and organization: Major General, U.S. Army, retired. Place and date: ----. Entered service at: Louisiana. Born: March 27, 1844, Newburyport, Mass. G.O. No.: 3, W.D., 1935. Act of Congress, March 21, 1935.

For his life of splendid public service, begun on March 27, 1844, having enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army on July 26, 1861, and by successive promotions was commissioned as major general February 10, 1906, and retired by operation of law on his 64th birthday.

Greely's medal was awarded in contradiction to the revised 1916 Army warrant requiring combat action and risk of life "above and beyond the call of duty." [9] However, his medal was the second, and last, Army presentation contrary to the combat requirement, as Charles Lindbergh (an Army reservist not on active duty) received the award for his solo transatlantic flight eight years before, in 1927. Until after WWII the Navy Medal of Honor could be awarded for noncombat actions, reflecting different criteria within the United States armed forces.

Other honors

He was awarded the 1886 Founder's Medal of the Royal Geographical Society for his Polar expeditions. [10]

He was awarded an Honorary Fellowship and the Daly Medal by the American Geographical Society in 1922. [11]

On May 28, 1986, the United States Postal Service issued a 22 cent postage stamp in his honor. [12]

USS General A. W. Greely (AP-141)

The USS General A. W. Greely (AP-141), launched November 1944, was named in his honor.

Fort Greely

Big Delta Air Force Base, Alaska, was designated Fort Greely on August 6, 1955, in honor of Major General Adolphus Washington Greely. [13] [14]


Lady Franklin Bay Expedition

In 1881, First Lieutenant Greely was given command of the Lady Franklin Bay Expedition on the ship Proteus. Promoted by Henry W. Howgate, its purpose was to establish one of a chain of meteorological-observation stations as part of the First International Polar Year. The expedition also was commissioned by the US government to collect astronomical and polar magnetic data, which was carried out by the astronomer Edward Israel, who was part of Greely’s crew. Another goal of the expedition was to search for any clues of the USS Jeannette, lost north of Ellesmere Island. The expedition also crossed Ellesmere Island from east to west and Lt. James B. Lockwood and David L. Brainard achieved a new “farthest north” record of 83°23𔄂″.

In 1882, Greely sighted a mountain range during a dog sledding exploration to the interior of northern Ellesmere Island and named them the Conger Range.

He also sighted the Innuitian Mountains from Lake Hazen.

Two consecutive supply parties failed to reach Greely’s party encamped at Fort Conger on Ellesmere Island in 1882 and 1883. In accordance with prior instructions, Greely decided in August 1883 to abandon Fort Conger and retreat south with his team.

They reached Cape Sabine, expecting to find food and equipment depots from the supply ships, but these had not been provided. With winter setting in, Greely and his men were forced to winter at Cape Sabine with inadequate rations and little fuel.

A rescue expedition, led by Capt. Winfield Scott Schley, the USRC Bear, a former whaler built in Greenock, Scotland, was sent to rescue the Greely party.

By the time the Bear, along with ships, Thetis and Alert, arrived on June 22, 1884, to rescue the expedition, nineteen of Greely’s 25-man crew had perished from starvation, drowning, hypothermia, and in one case, gunshot wounds from an execution ordered by Greely.

Greely and the other survivors were themselves near death one of the survivors died on the homeward journey. The returning survivors were venerated as heroes, though the heroism was tainted by sensational accusations of cannibalism during the remaining days of low food.

Survivors with their U.S. Navy rescuers photographed on board USS Thetis –
(as numbered on the original print) Number 22 – First Lieutenant Adolphus W. Greely

In June 1886, he was promoted to Captain after serving twenty years as a Lieutenant and, in March 1887, President Grover Cleveland appointed him as Chief Signal Officer of the U.S. Army with the rank of Brigadier General.

During his tenure as Chief Signal Officer of the Army, military telegraph lines were constructed, operated and maintained during the Spanish American War.

In connection with Alaska, then General Greely had constructed under very adverse conditions a telegraph system of nearly 4,000 miles, consisting of submarine cables, landcables and wireless telegraphy, the later covering a distance of 107 miles, which at the time of installation was the longest commercial system regularly working in the world.

In 1905, he accepted the honor of serving as the first president of The Explorers Club and in 1915, he invited the Italian polar geographer Arnaldo Faustini to the United States for a lecture tour.

On February 10, 1906, he was promoted to Major General.

On April 18, 1906, Greely served as military commander over the emergency recovery from the San Francisco earthquake.

Then March 27, 1908, Greely reached the mandatory retirement age of 64.

In 1911 he represented the United States Army at the coronation of King George V.

Greely was awarded an Honorary Fellowship and the Daly Medal by the American Geographical Society in 1922.


General G. O. Squier-class transport

The General G. O. Squier class of transport ships was built for the U.S. Navy during World War II.

The first ship was launched in November 1942, while the last was launched in April 1945. In that span the United States produced 30 General G. O. Squier-class transports. The class was based upon the Maritime Commission’s Type C4 ship. The class was named for United States Army Major General George Owen Squier.

All of the ships were initially designated with hull classification symbol “AP” and numbered from 130 through 159. All but the four ships of the class (130, 131, 132, and 136) were transferred to the U.S. Army Transportation Service in 1946 and served as United States Army Transports (USAT), several of them being refitted to a larger gross tonnage. The 24 still in service (numbers 134, 135, 137–151, and 153–159) in 1950 were transferred back to the Navy as part of the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS). All but two were transferred on 1 March 1950, Ώ] and all were reinstated on the Naval Vessel Register as United States Naval Ships (USNS), and redesignated with hull classification symbol “T-AP”.

Most of the General G. O. Squier class were deactivated in 1958 for two reasons: the introduction of jet airliners, and a decision to use berthing space on U.S.-flagged passenger ships. ΐ] Two ships, however, General LeRoy Eltinge and General R. M. Blatchford, assisted in United Nations efforts in the Congo Republic in the early 1960s, and both were pressed into service transporting troops to Vietnam in the mid 1960s.

Two other ships of the General G. O. Squier class, General Harry Taylor and General R. E. Callan were transferred to the U.S. Air Force as missile tracking ships as part of the Missile Test Project, and renamed USAFS General Hoyt S. Vandenberg and USAFS General H. H. Arnold, respectively. They were later transferred back to MSTS under their new names and redesignated with hull classification symbol “T-AGM”.

The last General G. O. Squier-class ship afloat, the ex-General Hoyt S. Vandenberg, was sunk as an artificial reef off of the Florida Keys on 27 May 2009.


SS «Flying Enterprise»

SS «Flying Enterprise» var eit skip av C1-B typen bygd i 1944 i USA. Det vart opphavleg døypt «Cape Kumakari» og gjorde konvoiteneste under andre verdskrigen..

I 1947 vart fartøyet selt til det amerikanske reiarlaget Isbrandtsen Company, der namnet vart endra til «Flying Enterprise». Det gjorde frå no av teneste på den nordlege delen av Atlanterhavet dei følgjande fem åra som alminneleg fraktskip.

Då skipet i desember 1951 forlét Hamburg med destinasjon New York, hadde det ei last av bilar, råjern, ei ukjend mengd kontantar, og dessutan ubekrefta radioaktivt materiale på fem tonn for den fyrste amerikanske atomdrevne undervassbåten USS «Nautilus».

Tidlegare var alle skip nagla, men den nye og hurtige teknikk under andre verdskrigen var sveiste skip nytta. Libertyklassen var såleis òg sveiste. Likevel viste det seg at særleg midten av skroget hadde eit problem ved sveising, noko som også galdt «Flying Enterprise». Såleis oppdaga ein den 28. desember i særs hard sjø og ca. 300 sjømil frå England at skipet byrja rakna i skroget, like aktar for overbygningen. Besetninga gjorde mellombelse reparasjonar før ein freista å halda fram seilasen.

Den neste morgonen byrja skipet å krenga kraftig med ei slagside på 45°. Dei avgjorde då å forlata skipet, og sende opp nødsignal. Det amerikanske troppetransportskipet «General A.W. Greely» og det amerikanske dampskipet «Southland» reagerte og kom til unnsetning. Besetning og passasjerar vart evakuerte og redda, med tap av berre eit menneskeliv. Kapteinen på skipet, den danskfødde Kurt Carlsen, valde å verta ombord. Han nekta å forlata skipet før det anten sokk eller var vorte buksert til ei sikker hamn.

Den engelske slepebåten «Turmoil» kom til den 3. januar og gjorde fleire forsøk på å etablera eit slep, men utan resultat. Neste dag, den 4. januar, fekk Carlsen selskap av styrmannen på slepebåten Kenneth Dancy, og saman fekk dei etablert eit slep og påbyrja buksering med England som destinasjon. På dette tidspunktet var slagsida på skipet mellom 60 og 65°.

Bukseringa var ein suksess, inntil 40 sjømil frå den engelske byen Falmouth. På dette tidspunktet rauk slepetauet. Det vart gjort fleire forsøk på å gjenetablera samband med slepebåten, men alle utan resultat. Krenginga var no omkring 80°, og skipet låg så lågt i vatnet at Carlsen og Dancy såg seg nøydde til å forlata skipet, som sokk den 10. januar 1952.

Seinare har det vore mangfaldige spekulasjonar over kvifor kapteinen heldt ut så lenge. Det har mellom anna vore teoriar om at lasta inneheldt stats- eller militærhemmelege saker. [1]

Det er no kome fram at båten var lasta med zirkonium – eit metall som tyskarane kunne utvinne under annan verdskrig. Det skulle nyttast som ein del av ei brenselcelle i atomreaktoren i den atomdrevne undervassbåten USS «Nautilus».

I 2002, 50 år etter forliset, var ein privat ekspedisjon nede ved vraket. Den kunne konstatera at det var eit hol i sida av skroget, og dessutan at den løynlege lasta var vorten fjerna.


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USS General C. H. Muir (AP-142) was a General G. O. Squier-class transport ship for the U.S. Navy in World War II. The ship was crewed by the U.S. Coast Guard until decommissioning. She was named in honor of U.S. Army general Charles Henry Muir. She was transferred to the U.S. Army as USAT General C. H. Muir in 1946. On 1 March 1950 she was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS General C. H. Muir (T-AP-142). She was later sold for commercial operation under the names SS Chicago and SS San Juan, and was scrapped some time after 1985.

USS General H. B. Freeman (AP-143) was a General G. O. Squier-class transport ship for the U.S. Navy in World War II. The ship was crewed by the U.S. Coast Guard until decommissioning. She was named in honor of U.S. Army general Henry Blanchard Freeman. She was transferred to the U.S. Army as USAT General H. B. Freeman in 1946. On 1 March 1950 she was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS General H. B. Freeman (T-AP-143). She was sold for commercial operation in 1965, and eventually scrapped.

USS General M. L. Hersey (AP-148) was a General G. O. Squier-class transport ship of the U.S. Navy in World War II. She was named in honor of U.S. Army general Mark Leslie Hersey. She was transferred to the U.S. Army as USAT General M. L. Hersey in 1946. On 1 March 1950 she was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS General M. L. Hersey (T-AP-148). She was later sold for commercial use, and operated under the names SS Pittsburgh and SS St. Louis.

USS General W. C. Langfitt (AP-151) was a General G. O. Squier-class transport ship for the U.S. Navy in World War II. She was named in honor of U.S. Army general William Campbell Langfitt. She was transferred to the U.S. Army as USAT General W. C. Langfitt in 1946. On 1 March 1950 she was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS General W. C. Langfitt (T-AP-151). She was later sold for commercial operation under the name SS Transindiana, before ultimately being scrapped in 1983.

USS General W. H. Gordon (AP-117) was a troop transport that served with the United States Navy in World War II. After the war, she was transferred to the US Army and served as USAT General W. H. Gordon. With the outbreak of the Korean War, she was reacquired by the Navy as a civilian-manned Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) vessel, and redesignated USNS General W. H. Gordon (T-AP-117). She served again under the same designation in the Vietnam War.

USS General William Weigel (AP-119) was a troopship that served with the United States Navy in World War II. After the war, she was acquired by the US Army and became USAT General William Weigel. On the outbreak of the Korean War, she was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) and designated USNS General William Weigel (T-AP-119), a designation she retained for her later service in the Vietnam War.

USS Admiral C. F. Hughes (AP-124) was a Admiral W. S. Benson-class transport named in honor of Charles Frederick Hughes, an admiral in the United States Navy who served as Chief of Naval Operations from 1927 to 1930.

USS Admiral R. E. Coontz (AP-122) was an Admiral W. S. Benson-class transport built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract on 15 January 1943 at Alameda, California, by the Bethlehem Steel Corp., and launched on 22 April 1944. She was sponsored by Mrs. Edwin Kokko, daughter of Admiral Coontz, and commissioned on 21 November 1944, Capt. Montford R. Tawes, USNR, in command.

USS Admiral E. W. Eberle (AP-123) was laid down on 15 February 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Alameda, California launched on 14 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Earl Warren, the wife of the Governor of California who later became Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court and acquired by the Navy and commissioned on 24 January 1945, Capt. G. C. Carlstedt, USCG, in command.


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