USS Saint Paul CA-73 - History

USS Saint Paul CA-73 - History


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USS Saint Paul CA-73

St. Paul II

(CA-73: dp. 13,600, 1. 673'5"; b. 70'10", dr. 26'5"; s. 32 k.; cpl. 1,700; a. 9 8", 12 5", 48 40mm.. 22 20mm., 4 ac.; cl. Baltimore)

The second St. Paul (CA-73), ex-Rochester, was laid down on 3 February 1943 by the Bethlehem Steel Co. Quincy, Mass., launched on 16 September 1944; sponsored by Mrs. John J. McDonough, and commissioned on 17 February 1945, Capt. Ernest H. von Heimburg in command.

After shakedown in the Caribbean, St. Paul departed Boston on 15 May 1945 and headed for the Pacific. From 8 to 30 June, she underwent training out of Pearl Harbor and sailed on 2 July to join Task Force 38. This fast carrier striking force completed replenishment at sea on the 23d and then proceeded to launching points for strikes against Honshu, Japan's largest island. Between 24 July and 10 August, St. Paul screened the carriers as they delivered heavy air strikes on Kure, Kobe, and the Tokyo area in southern Honshu, then at Maizuru and various airfields in northern Honshu. During this period, St. Paul also bombarded industrial targets: first on textile mills at Hamamatsu during the night of 29 July, and then on 9 August at iron and steel works in Kamaishi, firing the war's last hostile salvo from a major ship. Typhoon warnings canceled air operations on 11 August until the 14th. Then those launched that morning were recalled, after peace negotiations gave promise of Japan's surrender. On the 15th, all offensive operations against Japan were stopped.

St. Paul, with other units of the 3d Fleet, retired to the southeast to patrol the coast while awaiting orders. On the 27th, she steamed into Sagami Wan to support United States occupation forces On 1 September, she entered Tokyo Bay and was there during the formal surrender ceremony the next day.

St. Paul remained in Japanese waters for occupation duty until she was ordered to Shanghai on 5 November to become flagship of TF 73. She navigated the Whangpoo River, anchored off the Shanghai Bund on 10 November, and remained there until late in 1946.

Returning to the Naval Shipyard, Terminal Island, Calif., on 1 October, she was overhauled to prepare for additional Far East duty. From 1 January to 15 Feb" wary 1947, she conducted refresher training at San Diego.

Following her return to Shanghai in March, St. Paul resumed operations as flagship for CTF 71 until returning to the United States in November. Next came training operations along the west coast including cruises for Naval Reservists during April and May 1948. From August to December of that year, she deployed to the western Pacific, serving in Japanese and Chinese waters. Back in the United States, she was converted from catapult to helicopter configuration before serving again in the Far East from April through October 1949.

When hostilities broke out in Korea in June 1950, St. Paul was conducting a midshipman training cruise from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor. She disembarked the future naval officers and proceeded late in July to the western Pacific where she joined Task Group (TG) 77.3 on patrol in the Formosa Strait. St. Paul remained on patrol between Formosa and mainland China from 27 August to 1 November. She then moved north into the Sea of Japan to join carrier TF 77, and commenced combat operations off the northeast coast of Korea on 9 November. On the 17th, she provided gunfire support to the United Nations troops advancing on ChongJin. That day, shrapnel from a near miss by a shell from a Communist shore battery injured six men at gun mount stations. The cruiser destroyed the enemy emplacement with counter-battery fire and continued her support mission.

As the Chinese Communists began massive attacks late in November, United Nations forces commenced a general withdrawal to consolidate and hold south of the 38th parallel. Paul provided close support for the Republic of Korea I Corps on their east flank as they withdrew from Hapsu, and along the coast, as they retired from Chongjin. On 2 December, she moved north again, conducted night harassing missions above Chongjin, then moved south to support the withdrawal of the Republic of Korea Capital Division to Kyong Song Man. She entered the harbor at Wonsan on the 3d to provide a curtain of shellfire around that city as United Nations forces and equipment were moved to Hungnam; then followed the forces there, and remained to cover the evacuation of that city and harbor between 10 and 24 December.

From 21 to 31 January 1951, St. Paul conducted shore bombardment missions north of Inchon where, on 26 January, she was again fired upon by shore batteries. On 7 April, in special TF 74, with destroyers Wallace L. Lind (DD-703), and Massey (DD-778), Fort Marion (LSD-22) and Begor (APD-127), St. Paul helped to carry out raids on rail lines and tunnels utilizing 250 commandos of the 41st Independent Royal Marines. These highly successful destructive raids slowed down the enemy's resupply efforts, forcing the Communists to attempt to repair or rebuild the rail facilities by night while hiding the work crews and locomotives in tunnels by day.

St. Paul returned to the United States for yard work at San Francisco from June to September, then conducted underway training before sailing on 5 November for Korea. She arrived off Wonsan on 27 November and commenced gun strike missions. During the following weeks, she bombarded strategic points at Hungnam, SongJin, and Chongjin. In December, she served as an antiaircraft escort for TF 77, and, following a holiday trip to Japan, returned to operations off the coast of North Korea. In April 1952, St. Paul participated in combined air-sea attacks against the ports of Wonsan and ChongJin. On the 21st, while the cruiser was engaged in gun fire support operations, a sudden and serious powder fire broke out in her forward 8-inch turret. Thirty men died. Before returning to Japan, however, she carried out gunstrikes on railroad targets near Songjin, during which she captured nine North Koreans from a small boat. Following a brief stay in port and two weeks on the gun line, she headed home and reached Long Beach on 24 June.

On 28 February 1953, St. Paul departed the west coast for her third Korean tour and was in action again by April. In mid-June, she assisted in the recapture of Anchor Hill. With battleship, New Jersey (BB62), she provided close support to the Republic of Korea army in a ground assault on this key position south of Kosong. The cruiser was fired upon many times by 75 and 105-millimeter guns, and observed numerous near misses, some only ten yards away. But on 11 July at Wonsan, she received her only direct hit from a shore battery. No one was wounded, and only her 3-inch antiaircraft mount was damaged. On 27 July, at 2159, she conducted her last gunstrike and had the distinction of firing the last round shot at sea in the war. The shell, autographed by Rear Admiral Harry Sanders, was fired at an enemy gun emplacement The truce was effective at 2200. Paul then commenced patrol duties along the east coast of Korea.

St. Paul returned to the western Pacific again in May 1954; and, later that year, she was on hand when the Chinese Communists were threatening the Nationalist Chinese islands of the Quemoy group. Between 19 November 1954 and 12 July 1955, she operated with the 7th Fleet in Japanese and Chinese waters, particularly between Taiwan and the Chinese mainland, playing a major role in protecting United States interests in the Far East. She returned to Long Beach for repairS and overhaul, but was back in the western Pacific from 15 August 1955 to 10 January 1956 serving as flagship for the 7th Fleet.

St. Paul returned to Long Beach in February and subsequently moved to Bremerton, Wash., for upkeep and overhaul. In September, she became flagship for the 1st Fleet and entertained the Secretary of the Navy during a fleet review at Long Beach. She departed that port on 6 November; and, after refresher training at San Diego, arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, on the 29th to relieve Rochester as flagship of the 7th Fleet. She spent most of her time in Keelung or Kaohsiung, Taiwan, with periods of training in the Philippines and port calls at Buckner Bay, Hong Kong Manila, and Sasebo. On 26 April 1957, she headed home.

St. Paul arrived at Long Beach on 21 May and subsequently cruised along the west coast, as far north as Seattle, until she sailed once more on 3 February 1958 for the Far East. She made an extensive cruise beginning at Pearl Harbor. Thence she steamed to Wellington, New Zealand; proceeded past Guadalcanal and north through the Solomons to New Georgia visited the Carolines; and ended at Yokosuka on 9 March. She repeated her past WestPac deployments with duties as flagship, and exercises in the Philippines, before returning to Long Beach on 25 August.

Sailing from Long Beach on 4 May 1959, St. Paul became the first major United States Navy ship to be homeported in the Far East since pre-World War II days. Based at Yokosuka, she did not return to Long Beach until 39 months later. Then, she assumed duties as 1st Fleet flagship and did not return to WestPac until 1965. From that year, she made five successful deployments with the 7th Fleet in operations off North and South Vietnam providing gunfire support to allied troops. Reminiscent of her Korean operations, St. Paul was hit on 2 September by a shell which struck her starboard bow, near the water line. None of her crew was injured; and her engineers repaired the slight damage, enabling her to continue her mission. For her splendid record of service in helping to combat Communist aggression in South Vietnam, St. Paul earned the Navy Unit Commendation and two Meritorious Unit Commendations.

At San Diego on 7 December 1970, St. Paul began inactivation procedures. She sailed to Bremerton Wash., on 1 February 1971 where she was decommissioned on 30 April and was placed in reserve with the Puget Sound Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

St. Paul earned one battle star for World War II service, eight battle stars for Korean service, and eight battle stars for Vietnam service.


Her keel was laid down as Rochester on 3 February 1943 by the Bethlehem Steel Company in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 16 September 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Marie Gordon McDonough, [1] wife of John J. McDonough, then mayor of St. Paul, Minnesota and commissioned on 17 February 1945, Captain Ernest H. von Heimburg in command. She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 31 July 1978, and was sold for scrapping in January 1980.

World War II

After shakedown in the Caribbean Sea, Saint Paul departed Boston, Massachusetts, on 15 May 1945 and headed for the Pacific. From 8󈞊 June, she underwent training out of Pearl Harbor and sailed on 2 July to join Task Force 38 (TF 38). This fast carrier striking force completed replenishment at sea on 23 July and then proceeded to launching points for strikes against Honshū, Japan's largest island. From 24 July to 10 August, Saint Paul screened the carriers as they delivered heavy air strikes on Kure, Kobe, and the Tokyo area in southern Honshū, then at Maizuru and various airfields in northern Honshū. During this period, Saint Paul also bombarded industrial targets: first on textile mills at Hamamatsu during the night of 29 July, and then on 9 August at iron and steel works in Kamaishi, firing the war's last hostile salvo from a major ship. Typhoon warnings canceled air operations from 11󈝺 August. Then, those launched that morning were recalled, after peace negotiations gave promise of Japan's surrender. On 15 August, all offensive operations against Japan were stopped.

Saint Paul, with other units of the Third Fleet, retired to the southeast to patrol the coast while awaiting orders. On 27 August, she steamed into Sagami Wan to support United States occupation forces. On 1 September, she entered Tokyo Bay and was there during the formal surrender ceremony the next day.

Post-World War II

Saint Paul remained in Japanese waters for occupation duty until she was ordered to Shanghai on 5 November to become flagship of TF 73. She navigated the Huangpu River, anchored off the Shanghai Bund on 10 November she remained there until early in 1946. On 21 December 1945 she was in collision with the Chinese (ex-Japanese) landing craft LST144, which was driven against the bow of Saint Paul by the force of the current. The landing craft sustained severe damage, the cruiser slight damage to the bow area. [2]

On 7 January 1946, Saint Paul departed Shanghai in company with Keith and returned to the Naval Shipyard, Terminal Island, California, on 28 January 1946 for a brief refit to make good the collision damage. In May, the ship made a round trip to Pearl Harbor. Returning to Terminal Island on 1 August, she was overhauled to prepare for additional Far East duty. [3] From 1󈝻 February 1947, she conducted refresher training at San Diego, California.

Following her return to Shanghai in March, Saint Paul resumed operations as flagship for TF 71 until returning to the United States in November. Next, came training operations along the West Coast, including cruises for Naval Reservists from April–May. From August–December, she deployed to the western Pacific, serving in Japanese and Chinese waters. Back in the United States, she was converted from catapult to helicopter configuration before serving again in the Far East from April through October 1949.

Korean War

Saint Paul fires her 8-inch 55-caliber (203-mm) guns at Chinese troops threatening the evacuation of United Nations forces from Hungnam, North Korea, in December 1950. The destroyer USS   Buck   (DD-761) , battleship USS   Wisconsin   (BB-64) , and Saint Paul steam in close formation during operations off the Korean coast in 1952. Saint Paul firing at Korean coastal batteries in 1953.

When hostilities broke out in the Korean War in June 1950, Saint Paul was conducting a midshipman training cruise from San Francisco, California, to Pearl Harbor. She disembarked the future naval officers and proceeded late in July to the western Pacific where she joined Task Group 77.3 (TG 77.3) on patrol in the Formosa Strait. Saint Paul remained on patrol between Formosa and mainland China from 27 August to 1 November. She then moved north into the Sea of Japan to join TF 77, and commenced combat operations off the northeast coast of Korea on 9 November. On 17 November, she provided gunfire support to the United Nations troops advancing on Chongjin. That day, shrapnel from a near miss by a shell from a Communist shore battery injured six men at gun mount stations. The cruiser destroyed the enemy emplacement with counter-battery fire and continued her support mission.

As the Chinese Communists began massive attacks late in November, United Nations forces commenced a general withdrawal to consolidate and hold south of the 38th parallel. Saint Paul provided close support for the Republic of Korea I Corps on their east flank as they withdrew from Hapsu, and along the coast, as they retired from Chongjin. On 2 December, she moved north again, conducted night harassing missions above Chongjin, then moved south to support the withdrawal of the Republic of Korea Capital Division to Kyongsong Man. She entered the harbor at Wonsan on 3 December to provide a curtain of shellfire around that city as United Nations forces and equipment were moved to Hungnam then followed the forces there, and remained to cover the evacuation of that city and harbor between 10 December and 24 December. (The now restored SS Lane Victory was one of the ships protected by her cover fire.)

From 21󈞋 January 1951, Saint Paul conducted shore bombardment missions north of Inchon where, on 26 January, she was again fired upon by shore batteries. On 7 April, in TF 74, with Wallace L. Lind, Massey, Fort Marion and Begor, Saint Paul helped to carry out raids on rail lines and tunnels utilizing 250 commandos of the 41st Independent Royal Marines. These highly successful destructive raids slowed down the enemy's resupply efforts, forcing the Communists to attempt to repair or rebuild the rail facilities by night while hiding the work crews and locomotives in tunnels by day.

Saint Paul returned to the United States for yard work at San Francisco, California, from June to September, then conducted underway training before sailing on 5 November for Korea. She arrived off Wonsan on 27 November and commenced gun strike missions in support of the UN blockade. During the following weeks, she bombarded strategic points at Hungnam, Songjin, and Chongjin. In December, she served as an antiaircraft escort for TF 77, and, following a holiday trip to Japan, returned to operations off the coast of North Korea. In April 1952, Saint Paul participated in combined air-sea attacks against the ports of Wonsan and Chongjin.

On 21 April, while the cruiser was engaged in gun fire support operations, a sudden and serious powder fire broke out in her forward 8-inch (203   mm) turret. Thirty men died. The explosion occurred in the turret's left gun, which was loaded but had the breech open. The gun captain thought the weapon had fired and told the gun's rammerman to ram another projectile into the gun's breech. The gun blew up, setting off two other powder bags in the powder hoist. [4]

Before returning to Japan for repairs, however, Saint Paul carried out gunstrikes on railroad targets near Songjin, during which she captured nine North Koreans from a small boat. Following a brief stay in port and two weeks on the gun line, she headed home and reached Long Beach, California, on 24 June.

On 28 February 1953, Saint Paul departed the West Coast for her third Korean tour and was in action again by April. In mid-June, she assisted in the recapture of Anchor Hill. With New Jersey, she provided close support to the Korean Army in a ground assault on this key position south of Kosong. The cruiser was fired upon many times by 75   mm and 105   mm guns, and observed numerous near misses, some only ten yards away. But on 11 July at Wonsan, she received her only direct hit from a shore battery. No one was wounded, and only her 3-inch (76.2   mm) antiaircraft mount was damaged. On 27 July, at 2159, she conducted her last gunstrike and had the distinction of firing the last round shot at sea in the war. The shell, autographed by Rear Admiral Harry Sanders, was fired at an enemy gun emplacement. The truce was effective at 2200. Saint Paul then commenced patrol duties along the east coast of Korea.

Post-Korea

Saint Paul returned to the western Pacific again in May 1954 and, later that year, she was on hand when the Chinese Communists were threatening the Nationalist Chinese islands of the Quemoy Islands group. From 19 November 1954 to 12 July 1955, she operated with the 7th Fleet in Japanese and Chinese waters, particularly between Taiwan and the Chinese mainland, playing a major role in protecting United States interests in the Far East. She returned to Long Beach, California, for repairs and an overhaul which included enclosing the command and flag bridge levels. Following this work she was back in the western Pacific from 15 August 1955 to 10 January 1956 serving as flagship for the 7th Fleet.

Saint Paul returned to Long Beach, California, in February and subsequently moved to Bremerton, Washington, for upkeep and overhaul. This overhaul period included removing the forward 5" gun turret and adding a large deck house between the funnels to accommodate enhanced flagship facilities. This work was completed by late summer, and in September, she became flagship for the 1st Fleet and entertained the Secretary of the Navy during a fleet review at Long Beach. She departed that port on 6 November and, after refresher training at San Diego, California, arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, on 29 September to relieve Rochester as 7th Fleet flagship. She spent most of her time in Keelung or Kaohsiung, Taiwan, with periods of training in the Philippines and port calls at Buckner Bay, Hong Kong, Manila, and Sasebo. On 26 April 1957, she headed home.

Saint Paul arrived at Long Beach, California, on 21 May and subsequently cruised along the West Coast, as far north as Seattle, Washington, until she sailed once more on 3 February 1958 for the Far East. She made an extensive cruise beginning at Pearl Harbor. Thence she steamed to Wellington, New Zealand proceeded past Guadalcanal and north through the Solomon Islands to New Georgia visited the Caroline Islands and ended at Yokosuka on 9 March. She repeated her past WestPac deployments with duties as flagship, and exercises in the Philippines, before returning to Long Beach on 25 August for maintenance and upkeep. Sailing from Long Beach, California, on 4 May 1959, Saint Paul became the first major United States Navy ship to be homeported in the Far East since before World War II. Based at Yokosuka, she did not return to Long Beach until 39 months later.

In late 1963 through summer 1964, as one of the only World War II cruisers still in commission and still in her wartime all-gun configuration (several others were in commission, but had been extensively modernized into guided missile cruisers), Saint Paul was extensively used in the filming of the motion picture In Harm's Way , starring John Wayne. In the movie, it is apparent that the ship has been slightly modified according to the standard of the Baltimore class - the front 5-inch cannon turret has been removed, leading to the larger gap between the bridge and second 8-inch turret, so in the movie the cruiser no longer has 12 5-inch guns, but only 10 5-inch guns. The ship was never mentioned by her actual name (her large hull number on the bow was painted over), but was simply referred to as "Old Swayback" and was supposedly commanded by Wayne's character as a captain, served as his flagship as a rear admiral, and was later sunk during a crucial battle with the Japanese.

St. Paul ' s forward 8"/55 caliber (203-mm) guns fire at enemy targets ashore in North Vietnam in October 1966 during the Vietnam War.

After her movie filming stint was over, she assumed duties as 1st Fleet flagship and did not return to WestPac until 1966. From that year, she made five successful deployments with the 7th Fleet in operations off North and South Vietnam, providing gunfire support to allied troops. Reminiscent of her Korean operations, Saint Paul was hit on 1 September 1967 by a shell which struck her starboard bow, near the water line. None of her crew was injured and her engineers repaired the slight damage, enabling her to continue her mission. For her service, Saint Paul earned the Navy Unit Commendation and two Meritorious Unit Commendations.

Saint Paul shelling Vietnam in 1969.

At San Diego, California on 7 December 1970, Saint Paul began inactivation procedures. She sailed to Bremerton, Washington, on 1 February 1971, where she was decommissioned on 30 April after 26 continuous years of active service to her country, and was placed in reserve with the Puget Sound Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

Saint Paul was the last all-gun Baltimore-class cruiser in US Navy service while Chicago and Columbus soldiered on until 1980 as Albany-class guided missile cruisers.

Struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 31 July 1978, Saint Paul was sold for scrapping in January 1980.

Saint Paul ' s ship's bell is now displayed in the St. Paul, Minnesota, City Hall on the third floor between the city council and mayoral offices, in an area also containing a listing of the United States Naval Reserve personnel from Saint Paul who served aboard the destroyer USS   Ward   (DD-139) when she fired the first American shots of World War II.


SAINT PAUL CA 73

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser
    Ordered as ROCHESTER
    Name changed November 26 1942
    Keel Laid February 3 1943 - Launched September 16 1944

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Saint Paul CA-73 - History

(CA-73: dp. 13,600, 1. 673'5" b. 70'10", dr. 26'5" s. 32 k. cpl. 1,700 a. 9 8", 12 5", 48 40mm.. 22 20mm., 4 ac. cl. Baltimore)

The second St. Paul (CA-73), ex-Rochester, was laid down on 3 February 1943 by the Bethlehem Steel Co. Quincy, Mass., launched on 16 September 1944 sponsored by Mrs. John J. McDonough, and commissioned on 17 February 1945, Capt. Ernest H. von Heimburg in command.

After shakedown in the Caribbean, St. Paul departed Boston on 15 May 1945 and headed for the Pacific. From 8 to 30 June, she underwent training out of Pearl Harbor and sailed on 2 July to join Task Force 38. This fast carrier striking force completed replenishment at sea on the 23d and then proceeded to launching points for strikes against Honshu, Japan's largest island. Between 24 July and 10 August, St. Paul screened the carriers as they delivered heavy air strikes on Kure, Kobe, and the Tokyo area in southern Honshu, then at Maizuru and various airfields in northern Honshu. During this period, St. Paul also bombarded industrial targets: first on textile mills at Hamamatsu during the night of 29 July, and then on 9 August at iron and steel works in Kamaishi, firing the war's last hostile salvo from a major ship. Typhoon warnings canceled air operations on 11 August until the 14th. Then those launched that morning were recalled, after peace negotiations gave promise of Japan's surrender. On the 15th, all offensive operations against Japan were stopped.

St. Paul, with other units of the 3d Fleet, retired to the southeast to patrol the coast while awaiting orders. On the 27th, she steamed into Sagami Wan to support United States occupation forces On 1 September, she entered Tokyo Bay and was there during the formal surrender ceremony the next day.

St. Paul remained in Japanese waters for occupation duty until she was ordered to Shanghai on 5 November to become flagship of TF 73. She navigated the Whangpoo River, anchored off the Shanghai Bund on 10 November, and remained there until late in 1946.

Returning to the Naval Shipyard, Terminal Island, Calif., on 1 October, she was overhauled to prepare for additional Far East duty. From 1 January to 15 Feb" wary 1947, she conducted refresher training at San Diego.

Following her return to Shanghai in March, St. Paul resumed operations as flagship for CTF 71 until returning to the United States in November. Next came training operations along the west coast including cruises for Naval Reservists during April and May 1948. From August to December of that year, she deployed to the western Pacific, serving in Japanese and Chinese waters. Back in the United States, she was converted from catapult to helicopter configuration before serving again in the Far East from April through October 1949.

When hostilities broke out in Korea in June 1950, St. Paul was conducting a midshipman training cruise from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor. She disembarked the future naval officers and proceeded late in July to the western Pacific where she joined Task Group (TG) 77.3 on patrol in the Formosa Strait. St. Paul remained on patrol between Formosa and mainland China from 27 August to 1 November. She then moved north into the Sea of Japan to join carrier TF 77, and commenced combat operations off the northeast coast of Korea on 9 November. On the 17th, she provided gunfire support to the United Nations troops advancing on ChongJin. That day, shrapnel from a near miss by a shell from a Communist shore battery injured six men at gun mount stations. The cruiser destroyed the enemy emplacement with counter-battery fire and continued her support mission.

As the Chinese Communists began massive attacks late in November, United Nations forces commenced a general withdrawal to consolidate and hold south of the 38th parallel. St. Paul provided close support for the Republic of Korea I Corps on their east flank as they withdrew from Hapsu, and along the coast, as they retired from Chongjin. On 2 December, she moved north again, conducted night harassing missions above Chongjin, then moved south to support the withdrawal of the Republic of Korea Capital Division to Kyong Song Man. She entered the harbor at Wonsan on the 3d to provide a curtain of shellfire around that city as United Nations forces and equipment were moved to Hungnam then followed the forces there, and remained to cover the evacuation of that city and harbor between 10 and 24 December.

From 21 to 31 January 1951, St. Paul conducted shore bombardment missions north of Inchon where, on 26 January, she was again fired upon by shore batteries. On 7 April, in special TF 74, with destroyers Wallace L. Lind (DD-703), and Massey (DD-778), Fort Marion (LSD-22) and Begor (APD-127), St. Paul helped to carry out raids on rail lines and tunnels utilizing 250 commandos of the 41st Independent Royal Marines. These highly successful destructive raids slowed down the enemy's resupply efforts, forcing the Communists to attempt to repair or rebuild the rail facilities by night while hiding the work crews and locomotives in tunnels by day.

St. Paul returned to the United States for yard work at San Francisco from June to September, then conducted underway training before sailing on 5 November for Korea. She arrived off Wonsan on 27 November and commenced gun strike missions. During the following weeks, she bombarded strategic points at Hungnam, SongJin, and Chongjin. In December, she served as an antiaircraft escort for TF 77, and, following a holiday trip to Japan, returned to operations off the coast of North Korea. In April 1952, St. Paul participated in combined air-sea attacks against the ports of Wonsan and ChongJin. On the 21st, while the cruiser was engaged in gun fire support operations, a sudden and serious powder fire broke out in her forward 8-inch turret. Thirty men died. Before returning to Japan, however, she carried out gunstrikes on railroad targets near Songjin, during which she captured nine North Koreans from a small boat. Following a brief stay in port and two weeks on the gun line, she headed home and reached Long Beach on 24 June.

On 28 February 1953, St. Paul departed the west coast for her third Korean tour and was in action again by April. In mid-June, she assisted in the recapture of Anchor Hill. With battleship, New Jersey (BB62), she provided close support to the Republic of Korea army in a ground assault on this key position south of Kosong. The cruiser was fired upon many times by 75 and 105-millimeter guns, and observed numerous near misses, some only ten yards away. But on 11 July at Wonsan, she received her only direct hit from a shore battery. No one was wounded, and only her 3-inch antiaircraft mount was damaged. On 27 July, at 2159, she conducted her last gunstrike and had the distinction of firing the last round shot at sea in the war. The shell, autographed by Rear Admiral Harry Sanders, was fired at an enemy gun emplacement The truce was effective at 2200. St. Paul then commenced patrol duties along the east coast of Korea.

St. Paul returned to the western Pacific again in May 1954 and, later that year, she was on hand when the Chinese Communists were threatening the Nationalist Chinese islands of the Quemoy group. Between 19 November 1954 and 12 July 1955, she operated with the 7th Fleet in Japanese and Chinese waters, particularly between Taiwan and the Chinese mainland, playing a major role in protecting United States interests in the Far East. She returned to Long Beach for repairS and overhaul, but was back in the western Pacific from 15 August 1955 to 10 January 1956 serving as flagship for the 7th Fleet.

St. Paul returned to Long Beach in February and subsequently moved to Bremerton, Wash., for upkeep and overhaul. In September, she became flagship for the 1st Fleet and entertained the Secretary of the Navy during a fleet review at Long Beach. She departed that port on 6 November and, after refresher training at San Diego, arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, on the 29th to relieve Rochester as flagship of the 7th Fleet. She spent most of her time in Keelung or Kaohsiung, Taiwan, with periods of training in the Philippines and port calls at Buckner Bay, Hong Kong Manila, and Sasebo. On 26 April 1957, she headed home.

St. Paul arrived at Long Beach on 21 May and subsequently cruised along the west coast, as far north as Seattle, until she sailed once more on 3 February 1958 for the Far East. She made an extensive cruise beginning at Pearl Harbor. Thence she steamed to Wellington, New Zealand proceeded past Guadalcanal and north through the Solomons to New Georgia visited the Carolines and ended at Yokosuka on 9 March. She repeated her past WestPac deployments with duties as flagship, and exercises in the Philippines, before returning to Long Beach on 25 August.

Sailing from Long Beach on 4 May 1959, St. Paul became the first major United States Navy ship to be homeported in the Far East since pre-World War II days. Based at Yokosuka, she did not return to Long Beach until 39 months later. Then, she assumed duties as 1st Fleet flagship and did not return to WestPac until 1965. From that year, she made five successful deployments with the 7th Fleet in operations off North and South Vietnam providing gunfire support to allied troops. Reminiscent of her Korean operations, St. Paul was hit on 2 September by a shell which struck her starboard bow, near the water line. None of her crew was injured and her engineers repaired the slight damage, enabling her to continue her mission. For her splendid record of service in helping to combat Communist aggression in South Vietnam, St. Paul earned the Navy Unit Commendation and two Meritorious Unit Commendations.

At San Diego on 7 December 1970, St. Paul began inactivation procedures. She sailed to Bremerton Wash., on 1 February 1971 where she was decommissioned on 30 April and was placed in reserve with the Puget Sound Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

St. Paul earned one battle star for World War II service, eight battle stars for Korean service, and eight battle stars for Vietnam service.


Ricketts graduated from high school in Kansas in 1922. He enlisted in the Navy, attended the United States Naval Academy, and became an officer upon his graduation in 1929. He was captain of the boxing team for two years at Annapolis. As a lieutenant, he was the gunnery officer on board the USS West Virginia (BB-48) during the attack on Pearl Harbor. In addition to his duties with the anti-aircraft battery, he helped attend dying captain Mervyn Bennion, with the aid of Doris Miller assisted in counter-flooding the ship after it heeled over from six torpedoes and two bombs and assisted in fire fighting. [1] [2] He was awarded with the Legion of Merit and the Navy Commendation Medal for his service in World War II.

Ricketts commanded USS Saint Paul (CA-73) during 1955. In July 1952 he became head of the Amphibious Warfare Branch in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations under command of Admiral William Fechteler. He later became commander of the Second Fleet and then assumed duties as the Vice Chief of Naval Operations in September 1961. He succeeded admiral James Sargent Russell in this capacity.

Admiral Claude Vernon Ricketts died of a massive heart attack on July 6, 1964, while still in office. He was posthumously awarded the Navy Distinguished Service Medal for his service as Vice Chief of Naval Operations. After his death, the destroyer USS Biddle was renamed USS Claude V. Ricketts (DDG-5) in his honor, as was Ricketts Hall [3] at the Naval Academy.

Claude's son Rear Admiral Myron Ricketts, USN Ret., designed and engineered many ships. [ citation needed ]


Contents

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

After shakedown in the Caribbean Sea, Saint Paul departed Boston, Massachusetts, on 15 May 1945 and headed for the Pacific. From 8–30 June, she underwent training out of Pearl Harbor and sailed on 2 July to join Task Force 38 (TF 38). This fast carrier striking force completed replenishment at sea on 23 July and then proceeded to launching points for strikes against Honshū, Japan's largest island. From 24 July to 10 August, Saint Paul screened the carriers as they delivered heavy air strikes on Kure, Kobe, and the Tokyo area in southern Honshū, then at Maizuru and various airfields in northern Honshū. During this period, Saint Paul also bombarded industrial targets: first on textile mills at Hamamatsu during the night of 29 July, and then on 9 August at iron and steel works in Kamaishi, firing the war's last hostile salvo from a major ship. Typhoon warnings canceled air operations from 11–14 August. Then, those launched that morning were recalled, after peace negotiations gave promise of Japan's surrender. On 15 August, all offensive operations against Japan were stopped.

Saint Paul, with other units of the Third Fleet, retired to the southeast to patrol the coast while awaiting orders. On 27 August, she steamed into Sagami Wan to support United States occupation forces. On 1 September, she entered Tokyo Bay and was there during the formal surrender ceremony the next day.

Post-World War II [ edit | edit source ]

Saint Paul remained in Japanese waters for occupation duty until she was ordered to Shanghai on 5 November to become flagship of TF 73. She navigated the Whangpoo River, anchored off the Shanghai Bund on 10 November she remained there until early in 1946. On 21 December 1945 she was in collision with the Chinese (ex-Japanese) landing craft LST144, which was driven against the bow of Saint Paul by the force of the current. The landing craft sustained severe damage, the cruiser slight damage to the bow area. Ώ]

On 7 January 1946, Saint Paul departed Shanghai in company with Keith and returned to the Naval Shipyard, Terminal Island, California, on 28 January 1946 for a brief refit to make good the collision damage. In May, the ship made a round trip to Pearl Harbor. Returning to Terminal Island on 1 August, she was overhauled to prepare for additional Far East duty. ΐ] From 1–15 February 1947, she conducted refresher training at San Diego, California.

Following her return to Shanghai in March, Saint Paul resumed operations as flagship for TF 71 until returning to the United States in November. Next, came training operations along the West Coast, including cruises for Naval Reservists from April–May. From August–December, she deployed to the western Pacific, serving in Japanese and Chinese waters. Back in the United States, she was converted from catapult to helicopter configuration before serving again in the Far East from April through October 1949.

Korean War [ edit | edit source ]

Saint Paul fires her 8-inch (203-mm) guns at Chinese troops threatening the evacuation of United Nations forces from Hungnam, North Korea, in December 1950.

Buck, Wisconsin and Saint Paul steam in close formation during operations off the Korean coast, 1952

Saint Paul firing at Korean coastal batteries in 1953.

When hostilities broke out in the Korean War in June 1950, Saint Paul was conducting a midshipman training cruise from San Francisco, California, to Pearl Harbor. She disembarked the future naval officers and proceeded late in July to the western Pacific where she joined Task Group 77.3 (TG 77.3) on patrol in the Formosa Strait. Saint Paul remained on patrol between Formosa and mainland China from 27 August to 1 November. She then moved north into the Sea of Japan to join TF 77, and commenced combat operations off the northeast coast of Korea on 9 November. On 17 November, she provided gunfire support to the United Nations troops advancing on Chongjin. That day, shrapnel from a near miss by a shell from a Communist shore battery injured six men at gun mount stations. The cruiser destroyed the enemy emplacement with counter-battery fire and continued her support mission.

As the Chinese Communists began massive attacks late in November, United Nations forces commenced a general withdrawal to consolidate and hold south of the 38th parallel. Saint Paul provided close support for the Republic of Korea I Corps on their east flank as they withdrew from Hapsu, and along the coast, as they retired from Chongjin. On 2 December, she moved north again, conducted night harassing missions above Chongjin, then moved south to support the withdrawal of the Republic of Korea Capital Division to Kyongsong Man. She entered the harbor at Wonsan on 3 December to provide a curtain of shellfire around that city as United Nations forces and equipment were moved to Hungnam then followed the forces there, and remained to cover the evacuation of that city and harbor between 10 December and 24 December. The restored SS Lane Victory was one of the ships protected by her cover fire.

From 21–31 January 1951, Saint Paul conducted shore bombardment missions north of Inchon where, on 26 January, she was again fired upon by shore batteries. On 7 April, in TF 74, with Wallace L. Lind, Massey, Fort Marion and Begor, Saint Paul helped to carry out raids on rail lines and tunnels utilizing 250 commandos of the 41st Independent Royal Marines. These highly successful destructive raids slowed down the enemy's resupply efforts, forcing the Communists to attempt to repair or rebuild the rail facilities by night while hiding the work crews and locomotives in tunnels by day.

Saint Paul returned to the United States for yard work at San Francisco, California, from June to September, then conducted underway training before sailing on 5 November for Korea. She arrived off Wonsan on 27 November and commenced gun strike missions in support of the UN blockade. During the following weeks, she bombarded strategic points at Hungnam, Songjin, and Chongjin. In December, she served as an antiaircraft escort for TF 77, and, following a holiday trip to Japan, returned to operations off the coast of North Korea. In April 1952, Saint Paul participated in combined air-sea attacks against the ports of Wonsan and Chongjin.

On 21 April, while the cruiser was engaged in gun fire support operations, a sudden and serious powder fire broke out in her forward 8-inch (203 mm) turret. Thirty men died. The explosion occurred in the turret's left gun, which was loaded but had the breech open. The gun captain thought the weapon had fired and told the gun's rammerman to ram another projectile into the gun's breech. The gun blew up, setting off two other powder bags in the powder hoist. Α]

Before returning to Japan for repairs, however, Saint Paul carried out gunstrikes on railroad targets near Songjin, during which she captured nine North Koreans from a small boat. Following a brief stay in port and two weeks on the gun line, she headed home and reached Long Beach, California, on 24 June.

On 28 February 1953, Saint Paul departed the West Coast for her third Korean tour and was in action again by April. In mid-June, she assisted in the recapture of Anchor Hill. With New Jersey, she provided close support to the Korean Army in a ground assault on this key position south of Kosong. The cruiser was fired upon many times by 75 mm and 105 mm guns, and observed numerous near misses, some only ten yards away. But on 11 July at Wonsan, she received her only direct hit from a shore battery. No one was wounded, and only her 3-inch (76.2 mm) antiaircraft mount was damaged. On 27 July, at 2159, she conducted her last gunstrike and had the distinction of firing the last round shot at sea in the war. The shell, autographed by Rear Admiral Harry Sanders, was fired at an enemy gun emplacement. The truce was effective at 2200. Saint Paul then commenced patrol duties along the east coast of Korea.

Post-Korea [ edit | edit source ]

Saint Paul returned to the western Pacific again in May 1954 and, later that year, she was on hand when the Chinese Communists were threatening the Nationalist Chinese islands of the Quemoy Islands group. From 19 November 1954 to 12 July 1955, she operated with the 7th Fleet in Japanese and Chinese waters, particularly between Taiwan and the Chinese mainland, playing a major role in protecting United States interests in the Far East. She returned to Long Beach, California, for repairs and overhaul, but was back in the western Pacific from 15 August 1955 to 10 January 1956 serving as flagship for the 7th Fleet.

Saint Paul returned to Long Beach, California, in February and subsequently moved to Bremerton, Washington, for upkeep and overhaul. This overhaul period included adding a large deck house between the funnels to accommodate enhanced flagship facilities. This work was completed by late summer, and in September, she became flagship for the 1st Fleet and entertained the Secretary of the Navy during a fleet review at Long Beach. She departed that port on 6 November and, after refresher training at San Diego, California, arrived at Yokosuka, Japan on 29 September to relieve Rochester as 7th Fleet flagship. She spent most of her time in Keelung or Kaohsiung, Taiwan, with periods of training in the Philippines and port calls at Buckner Bay, Hong Kong, Manila, and Sasebo. On 26 April 1957, she headed home.

Saint Paul arrived at Long Beach, California, on 21 May and subsequently cruised along the West Coast, as far north as Seattle, Washington, until she sailed once more on 3 February 1958 for the Far East. She made an extensive cruise beginning at Pearl Harbor. Thence she steamed to Wellington, New Zealand proceeded past Guadalcanal and north through the Solomon Islands to New Georgia visited the Caroline Islands and ended at Yokosuka on 9 March. She repeated her past WestPac deployments with duties as flagship, and exercises in the Philippines, before returning to Long Beach on 25 August.

Sailing from Long Beach, California, on 4 May 1959, Saint Paul became the first major United States Navy ship to be homeported in the Far East since before World War II. Based at Yokosuka, she did not return to Long Beach until 39 months later. Then, she assumed duties as 1st Fleet flagship and did not return to WestPac until 1966. From that year, she made five successful deployments with the 7th Fleet in operations off North and South Vietnam, providing gunfire support to allied troops. Reminiscent of her Korean operations, Saint Paul was hit on 2 September by a shell which struck her starboard bow, near the water line. None of her crew was injured and her engineers repaired the slight damage, enabling her to continue her mission. For her splendid record of service in helping to combat Communist aggression in South Vietnam, Saint Paul earned the Navy Unit Commendation and two Meritorious Unit Commendations.

USS Saint Paul (CA-73) shelling Vietnam, in 1969.

In 1964, as the only World War II cruiser still in commission and still in her wartime all-gun configuration (several others were in commission, but had been extensively modernized into guided missile cruisers), Saint Paul was extensively used in the filming of the motion picture In Harm's Way, starring John Wayne. In the movie, it is apparent that the ship has been slightly modified according to the standard of the Baltimore class - the front 5-inch cannon turret has been removed, leading to the larger gap between the bridge and second 8-inch turret, so in the movie the cruiser no longer has 12 5-inch guns, but only 10 5-inch guns. The ship was never mentioned by her actual name (her large hull number on the bow was painted over), but was simply referred to as "Old Swayback" and was supposedly commanded by Wayne's character as a captain, served as his flagship as a rear admiral, and was later sunk during a crucial battle with the Japanese.

At San Diego, California on 7 December 1970, Saint Paul began inactivation procedures. She sailed to Bremerton, Washington on 1 February 1971, where she was decommissioned on 30 April after 26 years of active service to her country, and was placed in reserve with the Puget Sound Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

Saint Paul was the last all-gun Baltimore-class cruiser in US Navy service (Chicago and Columbus soldiered on into the eighties as Albany-class guided missile cruisers).

Struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 31 July 1978, Saint Paul was sold for scrapping in January 1980.

The cruiser Saint Paul ship's bell is now displayed in the St. Paul, Minnesota City Hall on the 3rd floor between the council and mayoral offices, in an area also containing a listing of the Naval Reservists from Saint Paul who served aboard the USS Ward when she fired the first American shots of World War II.


USS Saint Paul (CA-73)

USS Saint Paul (CA-73), a Baltimore-class cruiser, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Saint Paul, Minnesota.

From 21–31 January 1951, Saint Paul performed shore bombardment missions north of Inchon the place, on 26 January, she was once more fired upon by shore batteries. On 7 April, in TF 74, with Wallace L. Lind, Massey, Fort Marion and Begor, Saint Paul helped to hold out raids on rail traces and tunnels using 250 commandos of the forty first Independent Royal Marines. These extremely profitable damaging raids slowed down the enemy’s resupply efforts, forcing the Communists to try to restore or rebuild the rail amenities by night time whereas hiding the work crews and locomotives in tunnels by day.

As the Chinese Communists started huge assaults late in November, United Nations forces commenced a basic withdrawal to consolidate and maintain south of the thirty eighth parallel. Saint Paul offered shut assist for the Republic of Korea I Corps on their east flank as they withdrew from Hapsu, and alongside the coast, as they retired from Chongjin. On 2 December, she moved north once more, performed night time harassing missions above Chongjin, then moved south to assist the withdrawal of the Republic of Korea Capital Division to Kyongsong Man. She entered the harbor at Wonsan on 3 December to offer a curtain of shellfire round that metropolis as United Nations forces and gear had been moved to Hungnam then adopted the forces there, and remained to cowl the evacuation of that metropolis and harbor between 10 December and 24 December. (The now restored SS Lane Victory was one of many ships protected by her cowl fireplace.)

When hostilities broke out within the Korean War in June 1950, Saint Paul was conducting a midshipman coaching cruise from San Francisco, California, to Pearl Harbor. She disembarked the long run naval officers and proceeded late in July to the western Pacific the place she joined Task Group 77.3 (TG 77.3) on patrol within the Formosa Strait. Saint Paul remained on patrol between Formosa and mainland China from 27 August to 1 November. She then moved north into the Sea of Japan to affix TF 77, and commenced fight operations off the northeast coast of Korea on 9 November. On 17 November, she offered gunfire assist to the United Nations troops advancing on Chongjin. That day, shrapnel from a close to miss by a shell from a Communist shore battery injured six males at gun mount stations. The cruiser destroyed the enemy emplacement with counter-battery fireplace and continued her assist mission.

Following her return to Shanghai in March, Saint Paul resumed operations as flagship for TF 71 till returning to the United States in November. Next, got here coaching operations alongside the West Coast, together with cruises for Naval Reservists from April–May. From August–December, she deployed to the western Pacific, serving in Japanese and Chinese waters. Back within the United States, she was transformed from catapult to helicopter configuration earlier than serving once more within the Far East from April by means of October 1949.

On 7 January 1946, Saint Paul departed Shanghai in firm with Keith and returned to the Naval Shipyard, Terminal Island, California, on 28 January 1946 for a quick refit to make good the collision injury. In May, the ship made a spherical journey to Pearl Harbor. Returning to Terminal Island on 1 August, she was overhauled to arrange for added Far East responsibility. [3] From 1–15 February 1947, she performed refresher coaching at San Diego, California.

Saint Paul remained in Japanese waters for occupation responsibility till she was ordered to Shanghai on 5 November to grow to be flagship of TF 73. She navigated the Huangpu River, anchored off the Shanghai Bund on 10 November she remained there till early in 1946. On 21 December 1945 she was in collision with the Chinese (ex-Japanese) touchdown craft LST144, which was pushed in opposition to the bow of Saint Paul by the pressure of the present. The touchdown craft sustained extreme injury, the cruiser slight injury to the bow space. [2]

Saint Paul, with different models of the Third Fleet, retired to the southeast to patrol the coast whereas awaiting orders. On 27 August, she steamed into Sagami Wan to assist United States occupation forces. On 1 September, she entered Tokyo Bay and was there throughout the formal give up ceremony the following day.

After shakedown within the Caribbean Sea, Saint Paul departed Boston, Massachusetts, on 15 May 1945 and headed for the Pacific. From 8–30 June, she underwent coaching out of Pearl Harbor and sailed on 2 July to affix Task Force 38 (TF 38). This quick provider putting pressure accomplished replenishment at sea on 23 July after which proceeded to launching factors for strikes in opposition to Honshū, Japan’s largest island. From 24 July to 10 August, Saint Paul screened the carriers as they delivered heavy air strikes on Kure, Kobe, and the Tokyo space in southern Honshū, then at Maizuru and varied airfields in northern Honshū. During this era, Saint Paul additionally bombarded industrial targets: first on textile mills at Hamamatsu throughout the night time of 29 July, after which on 9 August at iron and metal works in Kamaishi, firing the conflict’s final hostile salvo from a significant ship. Typhoon warnings canceled air operations from 11–14 August. Then, these launched that morning had been recalled, after peace negotiations gave promise of Japan’s give up. On 15 August, all offensive operations in opposition to Japan had been stopped.

Her keel was laid down as Rochester on 3 February 1943 by the Bethlehem Steel Company in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 16 September 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Marie Gordon McDonough, [1] spouse of John J. McDonough, then mayor of St. Paul, Minnesota and commissioned on 17 February 1945, Captain Ernest H. von Heimburg in command.
She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 31 July 1978, and was bought for scrapping in January 1980.


USS Saint Paul CA-73 - History

USS Saint Paul , an 13,600-ton Baltimore class heavy cruiser, was built at Quincy, Massachusetts, and commissioned in February 1945. She went to the Pacific following shakedown and participated in final operations against the Japanese home islands in July and August 1945, including firing her eight-inch main battery guns at targets ashore at Hamamatsu and Kamaishi. Saint Paul was present in Tokyo Bay when Japan formally surrendered on 2 September 1945. She supported occupation activities in Japan until November, when she went to Chinese waters, where she continued to serve until late in 1946. The cruiser had three more Far Eastern tours during 1947-49.

With the outbreak of the Korean War in late June 1950, Saint Paul again was ordered to the Western Pacific, operating off Formosa and in the combat zone from July 1950 until the Spring of 1951. She made two more Korean War deployments, in November 1951 - June 1952 and from March 1953 until the fighting ended, firing the Navy's final shore bombardment round on 27 July 1953. Over the next decade, Saint Paul served in the Far East on several occasions, including a 39-month cruise that began in 1959. Specially modified for flagship service, she was frequently employed in that role by both the Seventh and the First Fleets.

Beginning in 1965, Saint Paul made five further Western Pacific deployments for Vietnam War operations. Her eight-inch and five-inch guns were kept busy supporting U.S. and allied troops in South Vietnam and bombarding coastal targets in the North. USS Saint Paul decommissioned in April 1971, following 26 years of continous active service including combat in three wars. She was sold for scrapping in January 1980.

This page features selected views of USS Saint Paul (CA-73).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway in Massachusetts Bay, 15 March 1945.

Courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Maryland.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

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In Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, on 16 February 1945.

Courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Maryland.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 78KB 740 x 560 pixels

Off Wonsan, North Korea, with her guns ready for bombardment, during the Seventh Fleet's seige of that place.
Photograph is dated 20 April 1951.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 101KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

In Chongjin harbor, North Korea, with her 8-inch gun turrets trained toward bombardment targets.
Photo is dated 23 May 1952.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 178KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Underway on 26 March 1968.
Photographed by PH3 D.R. Hyder.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

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Photographed during the later 1960s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 97KB 740 x 595 pixels

Fires a salvo from her forward eight-inch gun turrets at enemy troops closing in on Hungnam, North Korea, during the evacuation of UN forces from that port.
Photograph is dated 21 December 1950.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 81KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Fires her forward 8"/55 guns at enemy gun positions at Hungnam, North Korea, on 26 July 1953, the day before the Korean armistice was signed.
Three shells are faintly visible in the upper right.
On 2159 hrs on 27 July 1953, a minute prior to the armistice taking effect, Saint Paul fired the last Navy bombardment round of the Korean War.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 97KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Actor John Wayne (top left, dressed as a Rear Admiral) on the ship's bridge circa August 1964, during the filming of the motion picture "In Harm's Way".
A Paramount Studios camera crew is in the foreground.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 110KB 640 x 675 pixels

Fires her forward 8"/55 guns in support of ground troops in South Vietnam.
Photographed by JO1 J. Johnson.
Image was received by the Naval Photographic Center in October 1966.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 94KB 740 x 590 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Under fire from shore batteries, while bombarding the Cong Phy railroad yard, 25 Miles south of Thanu Hoa, North Vietnam, on 4 August 1967.


USS Saint Paul CA-73 - History

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Ogie Banks – Honorable Discharge & Project Transition (to Xerox)

Mr. Banks received his honorable discharge from the Navy on August 8, 1973. Just prior to his honorable discharge, his captain selected him to participate in a new Navy program called “Project Transition." Xerox was a main sponsor of this project which trained service men as they were leaving the service. Under this program, Mr. Banks worked for Xerox Corporation, on the Sigma 5, 6, and 9 mainframe computers. After 4 months in this program, Xerox realized what an exceptional talent Mr. Banks was and offered him a job. Upon his release from the Navy, he immediately started working for Xerox in their IT department. In that same year he entered college on the GI Bill and later finished college on a Xerox scholarship.


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